Lewis Tappan

Lewis Tappan Lewis Tappan (May 23, 1788 – June 21, 1873) was a New York abolitionist who dedicated his efforts to securing freedom for the enslaved Africans aboard the ''Amistad''. He was born in Northampton, Massachusetts, into a Calvinist household.

Tappan was also one of the founders of the American Missionary Association in 1846, which established over 100 anti-slavery Congregational churches throughout the Midwest. After the American Civil War, the association founded numerous schools and colleges to support the education of freedmen.

Contacted by Connecticut abolitionists shortly after the ''Amistad'' arrived in port, Tappan devoted significant attention to the captive Africans. He ensured the acquisition of high-quality lawyers for the captives, ultimately leading to their release after the case reached the United States Supreme Court. Alongside his brother Arthur, Tappan not only secured legal assistance and acquittal for the Africans but also successfully bolstered public support and fundraising efforts. Finally, he organized the return trip home to Africa for surviving members of the group. Provided by Wikipedia
Showing 1 - 3 results of 3 for search 'Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873', query time: 0.01s Refine Results
  1. 1
    by Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873
    Published 1869
    New York, Anson D.F. Randolph & Co., 1869.
    24 p. 20 cm.
  2. 2
    by Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873
    Published 1870
    New York, Hurd and Houghton, 1870.
    432 p. front. (port.) 20 cm.
  3. 3
    by Tappan, Lewis, 1788-1873
    Published 1869
    New York, Anson D.F. Randolph & Co., 1869.
    1 online resource (24 p.)
    Center for Research Libraries
    Online Resource

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