United States Court of International Trade

The James L. Watson Court of International Trade Building on Foley Square The United States Court of International Trade (case citations: '''Int'l Trade or Intl. Trade) is a U.S. federal court that adjudicates civil actions arising out of U.S. customs and international trade laws. Seated in New York City, it exercises broad jurisdiction over most trade-related matters, and is permitted to hear and decide cases anywhere in the country, as well as abroad.

The court originated with the Customs Administrative Act of 1890, which established the
Board of General Appraisers as a quasi-judicial entity of the U.S. Treasury Department tasked with hearing disputes primarily concerning tariffs and import duties. In 1926, Congress replaced the Board with the United States Customs Court''', an administrative tribunal with greater judicial functions, which in 1930 was made independent of the Treasury Department. In 1956, the U.S. Customs Court was reconstituted by Congress as an Article III tribunal, giving it the status and privileges of a federal court. The Customs Courts Act of 1980 established the U.S. Court of International Trade in its current form, granting it jurisdiction over all trade matters and conferring its judges with life tenure.

The court's subject matter jurisdiction is limited to particular questions in international trade and customs law, though it may also decide any civil action against the U.S. government, its officers, or its agencies arising out of any law connected to international trade. As an Article III tribunal, the U.S. Court of International Trade can decide controversies in both law and equity, and is thus allowed to grant relief in virtually all means available, including money judgments, writs of mandamus, and preliminary or permanent injunctions.

Led by a chief judge, the court is composed of nine judges who are appointed by the U.S. President and confirmed by the Senate. No more than five judges can be of the same political party. Cases are typically heard by just one judge, and the court operates on procedures and protocols drawn heavily from the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Provided by Wikipedia
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  1. 1
    [Washington : G.P.O.]
    Online version of the print publication.
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    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
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  2. 2
    [Washington : G.P.O.]
    Online version of the print publication.
    Also issued in microfiche.
    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
    LLMC Digital
    Online Resource
  3. 3
    Published 1881
    Washington : G.P.O., 1881-1898.
    Also issued in print.
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    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
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  4. 4
    [Washington : G.P.O.]
    Online version of the print publication.
    Also issued in microfiche.
    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
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    Online Resource
  5. 5
    Published 1918
    Washington : G.P.O., 1918.
    2 v. (1879 p.) ; 24 cm.
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    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
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    Online Resource
  6. 6
    Published 1904
    Washington : G.P.O., 1904-1967.
    95 v. ; 24 cm.
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    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
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    Google, V.48(1925)
    Google, V.23(1912)
    Online Resource
  7. 7
    [Washington : G.P.O.]
    Online version of the print publication.
    Also issued in microfiche.
    ...Board of United States General Appraisers...
    LLMC Digital
    Online Resource

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